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The Ethics of United Nations Sanctions on North Korea: Effectiveness, Necessity and Proportionality
The legal and political consensus underpinning United Nations resolutions on North Korea is that DPRK denuclearization can be understood as a just cause. But were the means used by the United Nations in sanctioning North Korea also just? This question takes on particular urgency given the ongoing humanitarian challenges facing the country. Drawing on just war theory, Prof. Smith considers this question against the criteria of effectiveness, necessity and proportionality and reaches the conclusion that these standards were not met, imposing undue harm on North Korean citizens. The analysis raises questions about the ethics of sanctions, both generally and in the North Korean case, and how and if they should be designed going forward.

Speakers:
Hazel Smith, Professorial Research Associate, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London and Professor Emerita in International Security, Cranfield University
Stephan Haggard, Lawrence and Sallye Krause Professor of Korea-Pacific Studies, UC San Diego School of Global Policy and Strategy (Moderator)

Feb 6, 2023 04:00 PM in Pacific Time (US and Canada)

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Speakers

Hazel Smith
Professorial Research Associate @University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies
Professor Hazel Smith is Professorial Research Associate at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London and Professor Emerita in International Security at Cranfield University and Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. She received her PhD in International Relations from the London School of Economics and lived and worked for United Nations humanitarian organizations in North Korea for two years (where she earned a still-valid drivers license). Her publications include the award-winning North Korea: Markets and Military Rule (2015); Reconstituting Korean Security, (2007); and Hungry for Peace: International Security, Humanitarian Assistance and Social Change in North Korea (2005) as well as numerous articles on security, development and health issues in the country. Professor Smith has held fellowships at prestigious institutions in the US and Asia as well as the UK and is regularly called on to advise government agencies on North Korean issues.
Stephan Haggard
Lawrence and Sallye Krause Professor of Korea-Pacific Studies @UC San Diego, School of Global Policy and Strategy
Stephan Haggard is the Lawrence and Sallye Krause Professor of Korea-Pacific Studies, and serves as director of the Korea-Pacific Program. He teaches courses on the international relations of the Asia-Pacific at GPS covering political economy as well as security issues. He has done extensive research on North Korea in particular. In addition, he has a long-standing interest in transitions to and from democratic rule and the current phenomenon of democratic backsliding.